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Samba security alert.

April 12, 2016

Advisory overview

Qualys Vulnerability R&D Lab has released new vulnerability checks in the Qualys Cloud Platform to protect organizations against 8 vulnerabilities that were fixed in 8 bulletins announced today by Samba. Customers can immediately audit their networks for these and other new vulnerabilities by accessing their Qualys subscription. Visit our blog to see how to prioritize remediation.

Non-Qualys customers can audit their network for these and other vulnerabilities by signing up for a Qualys Free Trial, or by trying our FreeScan service.

Vulnerability details

Samba has released 8 security bulletins to fix newly discovered flaws in their software. Qualys has released the following checks for these new vulnerabilities:

  • Samba Multiple Vulnerabilities (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Serious 3
    Qualys ID
    70076
    Vendor Reference
    Samba Badlock Vulnerability, Samba CVE-2015-5370, Samba CVE-2016-2111, Samba CVE-2016-2112, Samba CVE-2016-2113, Samba CVE-2016-2114, Samba CVE-2016-2115, Samba CVE-2016-2118
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2113, CVE-2016-2114, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5.3
    Description
    Samba is a freely available file and printer sharing application. Samba allows users to share files and printers between operating systems on UNIX and Windows platforms.

    Badlock, a crucial security bug in Windows and Samba was disclosed which allows attackers to perform SAMR and LSA man in the middle attacks. A man in the middle can intercept any DCERPC traffic between a client and a server in order to impersonate the client and get the same privileges as the authenticated user account. This is most problematic against active directory domain controllers.

    Versions of Samba from 3.6.0 to 4.4.0 inclusive are vulnerable to denial of service attacks (crashes and high cpu consumption) in the DCE-RPC client and server implementations. In addition, errors in validation of the DCE-RPC packets can lead to a downgrade of a secure connection to an insecure one.

    The NETLOGON service in Microsoft Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Server 2008 SP2 and R2 SP1, and Windows Server 2012 Gold and R2, when a Domain Controller is configured, allows remote attackers to spoof the computer name of a secure channel's endpoint, and obtain sensitive session information, by running a crafted application and leveraging the ability to sniff network traffic, aka "NETLOGON Spoofing Vulnerability".

    A man in the middle is able to downgrade LDAP connections to no integrity protection. It's possible to attack client and server with this.

    Man in the middle attacks are possible for client triggered LDAP connections (with ldaps://) and ncacn_http connections (with https://).

    Due to a bug Samba doesn't enforce required smb signing, even if explicitly configured. In addition the default for the active directory domain controller case was wrong.

    The protection of DCERPC communication over ncacn_np (which is the default for most the file server related protocols) is inherited from the underlying SMB connection. Samba doesn't enforce SMB signing for this kind of SMB connections by default, which makes man in the middle attacks possible.

    Affected versions of Samba are:
    3.6.x,4.0.x,4.1.x,4.2.0-4.2.9,4.3.0-4.3.6,4.4.0

    Consequence
    Exploitation could lead to man-in-the-middle or denial of service attacks.
    Solution
    The vendor has released patches to resolve this issue. Refer to Badlock for more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    Samba Badlock Vulnerability Samba 4.2.9
    Samba Badlock Vulnerability Samba 4.3.6
    Samba Badlock Vulnerability Samba 4.4.0

  • Red Hat Update for samba (RHSA-2016:0618) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Urgent 5
    Qualys ID
    124895
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0618
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2113, CVE-2016-2114, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and the related Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allow PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and various information.

    The following packages have been upgraded to a newer upstream version: Samba (4.2.10). Refer to the Release Notes listed in the References section for a complete list of changes.

    Security Fix(es):

    * Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC). (CVE-2015-5370)

    Note: While Samba packages as shipped in Red Hat Enterprise Linux do not support running Samba as an AD DC, this flaw applies to all roles Samba implements.

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not validate SSL/TLS certificates in certain connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to spoof a Samba server using a specially crafted SSL/TLS certificate. (CVE-2016-2113)

    * It was discovered that Samba did not enforce Server Message Block (SMB) signing for clients using the SMB1 protocol. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to modify traffic between a client and a server. (CVE-2016-2114)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to conduct man-in-the-middle attacks or cause a denial of service.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0618 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0618 Red Hat Enterprise Linux

  • Red Hat Update for samba4 (RHSA-2016:0620) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Serious 3
    Qualys ID
    124893
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0620
    CVE Reference
    N/A
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6 / Temporal 4.4
    Description
    Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC).(CVE-2015-5370)

    A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111).

    It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    It was found that Samba did not validate SSL/TLS certificates in certain connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to spoof a Samba server using a specially crafted SSL/TLS certificate. (CVE-2016-2113)

    It was discovered that Samba did not enforce Server Message Block (SMB) signing for clients using the SMB1 protocol. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to modify traffic between a client and a server. (CVE-2016-2114)

    It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to cause a denial of service or conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0620 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0620 Red Hat Enterprise Linux

  • Red Hat Update for samba (RHSA-2016:0619) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Urgent 5
    Qualys ID
    124892
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0619
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and the related Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allow PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and various information.

    Security Fix(es):

    * Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC). (CVE-2015-5370)

    Note: While Samba packages as shipped in Red Hat Enterprise Linux do not support running Samba as an AD DC, this flaw applies to all roles Samba implements.

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to cause a denial of service or conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0619 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0619 Red Hat Enterprise Linux

  • Red Hat Update for samba and samba4 (RHSA-2016:0612) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Urgent 5
    Qualys ID
    124891
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0612
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2113, CVE-2016-2114, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and the related Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allow PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and various information.

    The following packages have been upgraded to a newer upstream version: Samba (4.2.10). Refer to the Release Notes listed in the References section for a complete list of changes.

    Security Fix(es):

    * Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC). (CVE-2015-5370)

    Note: While Samba packages as shipped in Red Hat Enterprise Linux do not support running Samba as an AD DC, this flaw applies to all roles Samba implements.

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not validate SSL/TLS certificates in certain connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to spoof a Samba server using a specially crafted SSL/TLS certificate. (CVE-2016-2113)

    * It was discovered that Samba did not enforce Server Message Block (SMB) signing for clients using the SMB1 protocol. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to modify traffic between a client and a server. (CVE-2016-2114)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to cause a denial of service or conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0612 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0612 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, 7

  • Red Hat Update for samba (RHSA-2016:0611) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Urgent 5
    Qualys ID
    124890
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0611
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and the related Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allow PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and various information.

    Security Fix(es):

    * Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC). (CVE-2015-5370)

    Note: While Samba packages as shipped in Red Hat Enterprise Linux do not support running Samba as an AD DC, this flaw applies to all roles Samba implements.

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to cause a denial of service or conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0611 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0611 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6

  • Red Hat Update for samba (RHSA-2016:0621) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Critical 4
    Qualys ID
    124889
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0621
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol and the related Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allow PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and various information.

    Security Fix(es):

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to cause a denial of service or conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0621 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0621 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

  • Red Hat Update for samba3x (RHSA-2016:0613) (BADLOCK)

    Severity
    Urgent 5
    Qualys ID
    124888
    Vendor Reference
    RHSA-2016:0613
    CVE Reference
    CVE-2015-5370, CVE-2016-2110, CVE-2016-2111, CVE-2016-2112, CVE-2016-2115, CVE-2016-2118
    CVSS Scores
    Base 6.8 / Temporal 5
    Description
    Samba is an open-source implementation of the Server Message Block (SMB) or Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, which allows PC-compatible machines to share files, printers, and other information.

    Security Fix(es):

    * Multiple flaws were found in Samba's DCE/RPC protocol implementation. A remote, authenticated attacker could use these flaws to cause a denial of service against the Samba server (high CPU load or a crash) or, possibly, execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running Samba (root). This flaw could also be used to downgrade a secure DCE/RPC connection by a man-in-the-middle attacker taking control of an Active Directory (AD) object and compromising the security of a Samba Active Directory Domain Controller (DC). (CVE-2015-5370)

    Note: While Samba packages as shipped in Red Hat Enterprise Linux do not support running Samba as an AD DC, this flaw applies to all roles Samba implements.

    * A protocol flaw, publicly referred to as Badlock, was found in the Security Account Manager Remote Protocol (MS-SAMR) and the Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol (MS-LSAD). Any authenticated DCE/RPC connection that a client initiates against a server could be used by a man-in-the-middle attacker to impersonate the authenticated user against the SAMR or LSA service on the server. As a result, the attacker would be able to get read/write access to the Security Account Manager database, and use this to reveal all passwords or any other potentially sensitive information in that database. (CVE-2016-2118)

    * Several flaws were found in Samba's implementation of NTLMSSP authentication. An unauthenticated, man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to clear the encryption and integrity flags of a connection, causing data to be transmitted in plain text. The attacker could also force the client or server into sending data in plain text even if encryption was explicitly requested for that connection. (CVE-2016-2110)

    * It was discovered that Samba configured as a Domain Controller would establish a secure communication channel with a machine using a spoofed computer name. A remote attacker able to observe network traffic could use this flaw to obtain session-related information about the spoofed machine. (CVE-2016-2111)

    * It was found that Samba's LDAP implementation did not enforce integrity protection for LDAP connections. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to downgrade LDAP connections to use no integrity protection, allowing them to hijack such connections. (CVE-2016-2112)

    * It was found that Samba did not enable integrity protection for IPC traffic by default. A man-in-the-middle attacker could use this flaw to view and modify the data sent between a Samba server and a client. (CVE-2016-2115)

    Consequence
    Exploitation could allow an attacker to conduct man-in-the-middle attacks or cause a denial of service.
    Solution
    Upgrade to the latest packages which contain a patch. Refer to Applying Package Updates to RHEL system for details.

    Refer to Red Hat security advisory RHSA-2016-0613 to address this issue and obtain more information.

    Patches:
    The following are links for downloading patches to fix these vulnerabilities:
    RHSA-2016-0613 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

These new vulnerability checks are included in Qualys vulnerability signature 2.3.281-3. Each Qualys account is automatically updated with the latest vulnerability signatures as they become available. To view the vulnerability signature version in your account, from the Qualys Help menu, select the About tab.

Selective Scan Instructions Using Qualys

To perform a selective vulnerability scan, configure a scan profile to use the following options:

  1. Ensure access to TCP ports 135 and 139 are available.
  2. Enable Windows Authentication (specify Authentication Records).
  3. Enable the following Qualys IDs:
    • 70076
    • 124895
    • 124893
    • 124892
    • 124891
    • 124890
    • 124889
    • 124888
  4. If you would like the scan to return the Windows Hostname, also include QID 82044 and ensure access to UDP port 137 is available.
  5. If you would like to be notified if Qualys is unable to log on to a host (if Authentication fails), also include QID 105015.

In addition, prior to running a scan for these new vulnerabilities, you can estimate your exposure to these new threats by running the Risk Analysis Report, available from the Qualys Vulnerability Management Reports tab.

Access for Qualys Customers

Technical Support

For more information, customers may contact Qualys Technical Support.

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